Use culture to attract top candiates – and keep them

Culture and passion is fundamental to employees

There is no secret that attracting top candidates for positions in small companies, is difficult. Some candidates might naturally be attracted to smaller working environments, however most job seekers want to work in big companies.

They might assume that benefits are better, that big means more flexibility and better options for career, more work security and so on. However who are they fooling?

Yes some might offer better benefits, but small companies are catching up on this as well. They might not offer a company vacation apartments, but they will have different set of benefits that the large companies are unable to offer due to size and established policies. Small means flexible, and an ear to the ground and the possibility to listen to what employees want. And the ability to develop a stron company culture which includes employees and embraces and creates an atmosphere where people love to be. Not just work, but actually spend their time.

In a survey, it turns out that 46% put work culture as very imporant when choosing a new employer. This is a huge opportunity for smaller companies to appeal to new candidates with a mission that shines. In the same survey 15% responded that they turned down an employment offer because of a mismatch in work culture. And even 10% would take a salary cut if they felt more passionate for their job. Another survey by Hays found that 71% would compromise salary for the right work culture (not directly a salary cut, but you get the drift).

If your employees put culture first, you as a manager and HR should do the same.

Salary isn’t everything and small companies should embrace this fact because this is your strenght. If you’re able to build passion amongst your employees, not only will you attract better candidates for less, but you’ll also be able to keep everyone in your company happy, work harder, evangelize your company more, tip their freinds about you, and stay longer in the company. It’s much harder to quit a job in a company you love than in a company you hate. It’s that simple.

The hard part is of course to do this in practise. Stay tuned for more tips on this.

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